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Courier Fraud

The courier scam is when fraudsters call and trick you into handing your cards and PIN to a courier on your doorstep. There are many variations of the scam, but it usually follows this method: A fraudster will cold call you on a landline, claiming to be from your bank or the police. In order to reassure you that they are genuine, they suggest that you hang up and ring the bank/police back straight away. However, they don’t disconnect the call from their end so that when you dial the real phone number, you are actually still speaking to the fraudster. They then ask you to read out your PIN or type it on your phone keypad. Finally they send a courier to you to collect your bank card. The fraudster will have then obtained your name, address, full bank details, card and PIN.

Our Advice

1. Report the fraud to Action Fraud.
2. If you have handed over any details to the fraudster, call your bank and cancel your cards immediately and where possible use a different telephone number.
3. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Investment Fraud

Share sale, boiler room, hedge fund or bond fraud involves bogus brokers, usually based overseas, cold calling people to pressure them into buying shares that promise high returns. In reality, the shares are either worthless or non-existent.

Our Advice

1. Report the fraud to Action Fraud. Break off all contact with the fraudster at once.
2. Alert your bank immediately if you’ve given the fraudsters your bank account details.
3. Keep any written communications you’ve received from the share sale fraudsters. This may help you give evidence to the authorities.
4. Because many boiler rooms are run from abroad, they are not covered by UK jurisdiction or compensation schemes. Therefore, you’re unlikely to recover any lost investment.
5. Be aware that you are now likely to be a target for other frauds. Fraudsters often share details about people they have successfully targeted or approached, using different identities to commit further frauds. People who’ve already fallen victim to fraudsters are particularly vulnerable to the fraud recovery fraud. This is when fraudsters contact people who’ve already lost money through fraud and claim to be law enforcement officers or lawyers. They advise the victim that they can help them recover their lost money but request a fee.
6. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Online Shopping Fraud

Internet shoppers are lured into buying phantom goods and services online by scammers who use a range of tricks including bogus websites and spoofed payment services. Be aware of phishing emails that look like they came from the payment site you’re registered with, asking you to update your account. Genuine online shopping sites will be indicated by the padlock symbol in the URL box.

Our Advice

If the seller has misrepresented the goods you’ve bought you can take the following action.
1. Report it to Action Fraud. Keep all evidence of the offence, including goods and correspondence.
2. Alert Consumer Direct by phone on 08454 04 05 06.
3. If paying by credit card alert your credit card company.
4. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Overpayment Cheques Fraud

Cheque overpayment fraud is when a fraudster pays a business for goods or services by a fraudulent cheque. The cheque is made for a higher than the actual value.
The business reimburses the fraudster with the excess amount of money that was apparently paid to it, before it discovers that the cheque was not genuine. Overpayment fraud is seen quite often around the sales of cars.

Our Advice

1. Report the fraud to Action Fraud.
2. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this crime and want to remain anonymous, please contact Crimestoppers.

Romance Fraud

Dating or romance fraud occurs when you think you’ve met your perfect partner online, but they aren’t who they say they are. Once they’ve gained your trust, they ask for money for a variety of emotive reasons. Once the fraudsters are confident that you have enough sympathy and desire for them, they will tell you about a problem they are experiencing in the hope that you will offer them financial support or they may ask you for an intimate picture which may be used to extort funds at a later date.

Our Advice

Trust your instincts. If you’ve only known this person for a short period of time and think something feels wrong, it probably is.

1. Report it to Action Fraud.
2. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Lottery Fraud

Lottery fraud happens after fraudsters contact you to tell you you’ve won a large sum of money in an international lottery, sweepstake or other prize draw, but in order to claim your prize you will be asked to supply personal information and copies of official documents, such as your passport, as proof of identity. The fraudsters can then use this information to steal your identity. Once you have provided your personal information, the fraudsters will ask you to pay various fees for example: taxes, legal fees, banking fees, etc, so that they can release your non-existent winnings. Remember you can’t win something you didn’t enter.

Our Advice

1. Report the fraud to Action Fraud.
2.If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.
3. Remember, if you haven’t bought a ticket, you can’t have won the lottery.

Bogus Trader Fraud

These people often work door to door or use flyers to approach householders. They generally offer maintenance work such as gardening, driveway repair and roofing and quote low prices which are later inflated. The work they carry out is of a very poor standard, overpriced and they often use intimidation to encourage home owners to accept offers of more work. Bogus traders use false names and addresses and are hard to trace.

Our Advice

If you have been the victim of a high-pressure seller or a bogus trader or require further advice, please contact the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 08454 04 05 06 or 0208 1850 710.

1. Report the fraud to Action Fraud.
2. If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Employment Fraud

Employment fraud happens when a fraudster claims to be a recruitment agent, hiring you for a job (which can be in a foreign country) that doesn’t exist. Once you have received the job offer, the fraudsters will contact you about arrangements. If the job is abroad, they will talk about arranging travel, accommodation and visas. You’ll be referred to an agency that, again, may have a website to give it credibility. The agency is supposed to help you with all your arrangements  for a fee. When you pay one fee (eg. a visa administration fee), the agency will tell you about another fee that has to be paid (eg. a deposit on accommodation). In reality, the fraudulent agency makes none of these arrangements. What’s more, the fraudsters may also ask for your bank account details to set up salary payments. They will use these details to steal money from your account.

Our Advice

1. Stop all communication with the a agency but make a note of their details and report it to Action Fraud.
2. If you’ve given them any money, contact your bank immediately.
3. Warn the operators of the website where you placed your CV that their site is being used by fraudsters.
4.If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

Social Engineering Fraud

Is the deception of a person, either over the phone or using a computer, with the express intent of acquiring enough financial/personal information that will allow a fraudster to access their target’s bank account. The fraudster may obtain information from various social media websites to give their targets confidence before persuading them to divulge further information.

Our Advice

If you are suspicious or feel vulnerable, don’t be afraid to terminate the call, and say no to requests for information. Always remember that banks will never contact customers by email to ask for passwords or any other sensitive information. If you have given out this information you can take the following action.

1.Report it to Action Fraud.
2.Report it to your bank who, depending on the level of information divulged, may suggest updating your security details.
3.If you suspect someone may be guilty of committing this offence, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously.

find out if you’re at risk

Take the quiz below to discover how you could be at risk and receive your Game of Fraud card. Don’t forget to share your card on Facebook and Twitter!

Email (optional)
Age (optional)
Income (optional)
Living (optional)
Gender (optional)
01. Do you shop online?
02. Do you understand how your personal details could be harvested from a variety of sources including social media?
03. Would you consider hiring a tradesman based on a phone call or face-to-face encounter if they are unknown to you?
04. Do you use dating sites?
05. Would you respond to a communication informing you that you have won a prize in a competition you don't recall entering?
06. Would you give out your personal banking details to a cold caller (e.g. the police or the bank) if they said there was an issue with your card or account?
07. Are you keen to take a risk to get the best rate of return on your investment?
08. When applying for a loan, would you pay an upfront fee to insure the loan after your initial application is approved?
09. Would you agree to take up a job position without meeting your new employer face-to-face?
10. Do you accept payments for goods and services by cheque?

Please fill out the captcha below:

7 + 1 =

X
01 a. Do you know how to check if the website you are using is secure?
01 b. Would you respond to an email that asks you to reactivate a suspended account or provide your security or bank details?
01 c. Do you check reviews / seller feedback about the website before buying for the first time?
X
02 a. Do you give thought to privacy settings when using social media?
02 b. Would you give out your personal details following a seemingly harmless request via telephone or email?
02 c. Would you send money to someone who has contacted you via social media?
X
03 a. On receiving a quote from an unknown tradesman would you seek quotes from other companies?
03 b. Would you seek details of their reputation from people you trust?
03 c. Would you allow a doorstep cold caller into your house?
X
04 a. Have you ever corresponded with someone overseas?
04 b. Would you consider sending an intimate picture of yourself to someone you've only met online?
04 c. Would you consider sending money to someone you've met online in response to an emotional plea?
X
5 a. Would you be willing to pay an 'admin fee' to release your winnings?
5 b. Would you provide bank details to secure your winnings?
5 c. Would you provide identification documents to secure your winnings?
X
06 a. Would you feel the need to verify the authenticity of the caller?
06 b. Would you use the same telephone line to call back your bank or the police?
06 c. Would you hand over your card to a doorstep courier if they say they are working on behalf of the bank or police?
X
07 a. Would you still consider the deal if it seems too good to be true?
07 b. Would you proceed with an unsolicited investment approach received by a company or person you've not dealt with previously?
X
08 a. Would you find it suspicious if your application for a loan was approved without completing a full credit check?
08 b. Would you check the official records to confirm that the organisation offering you the loan exists?
08 c. Would you provide your bank details to the loan provider in your initial application?
X
09 a. Would you check the official records to confirm that the organisation offering you the job actually exists?
09 b. Having secured a job would you provide your bank details to your recruiter if requested?
09 c. Would you be willing to pay a fee for payment of work materials or travel costs?
X
10 a. If someone paid you more than expected would you cash the cheque?
10 b. If someone then requested the difference would you give them it?
10 c. Would you notify your bank in the event of overpayment?

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